19/11/2019 Finance makes the world a new place

What Is Really Behind the NYSE Closure on 10-29-2012 – It’s Not Just Hurricane Sandy

What Is Really Behind the NYSE Closure on 10-29-2012 - It's Not Just Hurricane Sandy

The New York Stock Exchange closed its trading floors on Monday October 29, 2012 after Mayor Bloomberg told folks in New York on Sunday that the transit system, subway would close at 7 PM and perhaps for a couple of days. This included the underground traffic tunnels and mandatory evacuations were required for low-elevation areas were issued due to Hurricane Sandy with an expected storm surge of 11-feet, plus 75 mph winds. Okay so, let’s talk about the NYSE closure due to weather, something that by the way hasn’t happened in 30-years.

Now then, the other day on October 19, 2012 the stock market had a negative 205.43 day on the DOW, which happened to be the anniversary of the 1987 crash, also known as Black Monday (October 19, 1987). Well, consider this, the New York Times noted in their online emailed edition that “On This Day” in history; Oct. 29, 1929, stock prices collapsed on the New York Stock Exchange amid panic selling. Thousands of investors were wiped out. On the front page of the New York Times on that dreadful day of 1929 there was an article titled;

“Stock Market Collapse in 16,410,030-Share Day but Rally At Close Cheers Brokers; Bankers Optimistic to Continue Aid”

Okay so, I guess knowing these two coinciding patterns, that this might be a very wise day to close the NYSE with or without a “historic storm” some 850 miles wide, which is Hurricane Sandy, which now combining as it hits the shore with a cold front. You know what happens when you mix wicked cold air with very warm air from a Hurricane let’s say. You get amazing thunder and lightning storms and massive amounts of rain, plus all that energy and moisture from the Hurricane, ouch! And consider that this is …

Continue reading

The Shot Heard Round The World!

The Shot Heard Round The World!

As I expected, the U.S. downgrade by S&P was going to be a lot worse for the stock market than for treasuries. This came as major surprise for most people as it is counter intuitive. The reason being is that it was not so much a loss in confidence in the ability of the U.S. Government to pay its debts as it was a signal that the free spending ways of the last 50 years is ending. History shows that sovereign downgrades spark action in governments to tighten their belts and cut budgets. Less spending, whether it be in employment, infrastructure or social services including Social Security and Medicare means less aggregate demand in an economy and thus less revenue and profit.

In simple terms, the downgrade applies very little to the creditworthiness of U.S. Treasuries, even though we are now rated below Finland, Luxemburg and the Isle of Man. It was only S&P that downgraded us, while both Fitch and Moody’s left the triple A rating. The real effect, and what it really means to you and me, is that it is going to light a fire under our politicians ass to cut spending at a time when our economy is already incredibly fragile from not enough spending and consumer demand (70% of our economy is consumer spending) from our aging population which naturally spends less as it gets older and an already massively indebted population who has no more spending power.

With the recent drop, there is a lot of talk about this being similar to last year’s correction. This is not D?j? vu all over again. The global economy is slowing and the global debt crisis is getting more intense, and it’s not just a U.S. problem either. It is a global problem, particularly amongst the developed …

Continue reading